Reviewing Madison cappuccinos once more: Ledger Coffee

Back in 2008 and 2009, I set out to review as many cappuccinos in Madison as I could. Back then the “third wave” had most decidedly not hit Madison, and the only place that had a first rate cappuccino (by today’s standards) was the newly opened (and still excellent) Bradbury’s. (You can go back and see those reviews by using the “Madison Cappuccino Reviews” category in this blog.)

My standards were also much different back then. I had yet to move to the east coast where I learned a lot about cappuccinos and coffee in general, and had the privilege to try drinks from some of the wold’s best espresso shops in New York City, LA, and Europe. I also undertook to review some of DC’s coffee shops on this blog when I was living there (“DC Cappuccino Reviews” category). DC is no New York or LA, but they have a thriving coffee scene. So I learned quite a bit.

A lot has changed in Madison’s coffee scene since then, and I feel the need to take a look around town again. The pandemic also did a number on local coffee shops. Whether it was the flight of experienced baristas from food service or those paper to-go cups, it seems that cappuccino quality really deteriorated during the pandemic. I’m hoping this trend has reversed a bit.

I’m going to be a bit more holistic this time. Rather than breaking down ratings by each aspect of the cappuccino, I’ll just give single rating from 1 to 5 stars.  Also ratings will only reflect the cappuccino itself, not the coffee shop in general or other items there.  But I’ll describe what is great (and not so great) about each cappuccino.  I’m only going to try one location for the chains, and there will be some I avoid (like that chain with all of the health-code violations….). I’ll start with a go-to coffee shop near my house, in a formerly abandoned feed mill and beet processing plant.

Ledger Coffee

3241 Garver Green Suite 140

ledgercoffee.com

4 out of 5 stars (Very Good)

Located in the redeveloped Garver Feed Mill, Ledger is the only first-rate espresso shop within walking distance to my house. So I find myself there quite a bit. Up until a few years ago I just knew this building as a decaying former beet processing plant behind Olbrich Gardens that I would pass along the bike trail. Now it contains an Ian’s pizza, a fish co-op, kombucha producer, yoga studio, and a number of other interesting businesses.

Ledger Coffee
Ledger Coffee

Ledger roasts their own beans on site, and is a pretty small operation. They only have a few baked goods from outside bakeries, and they often sell out of the best stuff pretty early in the morning. They only do to-go orders (sad paper cups). Although the Garver site has lots of seating outside, so you can linger. This means that if you want them to make your drink in a real cup, you need to bring it yourself. So I brought along a 6 oz cup from home, and they happily made me a cappuccino in it.

Ledger Cappuccino

The milk and foam were top notch, with some nice latte art. Of course, latte art itself doesn’t matter, but its presence is a good indication that the milk is of the right consistency (with micro-foam instead of course foam) and the barista is skilled.  The foam was sweet and smooth – perfect actually.

The only reason why Ledger’s cappuccino isn’t top-tier is the “flatness” of the espresso.  I don’t know whether this is a problem with how the shot was pulled or the beans, but the espresso seems to lack much depth of flavor. There is simply a slight bitterness and standard espresso flavor, but not much in the way of interesting fruit, caramel, or chocolate notes.  I know that their single origin coffees are very good (and interesting) when I’ve prepared them at home (either pour-over or espresso), but I haven’t been as impressed with their prepared espresso. That being said I have not tried their espresso blend beans, so perhaps that is the issue.

Even given the lackluster espresso Ledger makes a very good cappuccino. After all, I keep coming back for it! I also highly recommend their seasonal lattes, including the really impressive rose latte that they have been serving lately. They also have very good vegan donuts on weekends (they are really good…trust me!). But come early, because they sell out fast.

A trip to Chicago’s Intelligentsia Coffee

I knew there would be good coffee the moment I spied the fixies out front.

Taryn and I take a yearly trip back to Wisconsin from DC, and this year we decided to spend a few hours in Chicago before heading up to Milwaukee.  Neither of us have spent any significant time in the city, so we thought this would be a good chance to do some exploring.  The original idea was to visit one of Chicago’s northern neighborhoods (Lakeview), where Intelligentsia Coffee has its original coffee shop (at 3123 N. Broadway St.), via the L.  Intelligentsia is one of the best coffee roasters in the country, and some of the best coffee shops all around the country use their beans, so their shop seemed like a good excuse to travel out of the Loop.  So that was the plan.  Plans don’t always work out, and we found ourselves at the downtown location instead (apparently L stations require exact change…my fault!  Though I have to say that my short experience with the L made me long for the New York Subway, or even DC Metro).

But everything turned out ok, because Intelligentsia’s coffee shop at 53 E. Randolph St.is beautiful and spacious.  It is really quite shocking, for someone used to the cramped coffee shops of DC, to see what reasonable rents can allow.  So there was no trouble finding a seat.  We both ordered cappuccinos, and the

Impressive latte art

latte art was beautiful (and unique) on both of them.  The foam texture itself was nearly perfect.  The espresso was quite complex, with hints of both berries and cocoa, though there was a slight bitterness that was slightly off-putting.  We both speculated that a sweeter milk  may have helped this a bit.  I won’t give a rating but I think this cappuccino fell just short of some of the best coffee shops in DC (Peregrine) and Madison (Bradbury’s), though daily variability likely places Intelligentsia in the same league as those other places.  However, from what I tasted, I certainly don’t think that Intelligentsia is significantly better than these other places (many claim that they serve some of the best espresso in the country), and it doesn’t match the phenomenal cappuccino that I had at 9th Street Espresso in New York last summer (although the latte art was exceptional, I don’t give this a great deal of weight – cappuccinos are primarily for drinking, not looking).  But if you are in Chicago, go to one of Intelligentsia’s locations; you won’t be disappointed.

Cappuccino Review #14 – Escape Java Joint

Escape Java Joint

*UPDATE* – NOW CLOSED

 

You really have to search for the part with the coffee.
You really have to search for the part with the coffee.

942 Williamson Street.
Madison

website

For an intro about how and why I am trying the cappuccinos of Madison, go here.

The Willy (for Williamson ) St. area is Madison’s most eclectic.  It is full of students and hippies.  They have their own currency and the towns largest coop.  So, it isn’t all that surprising that the coffee shops in this area are a bit odd.  Mother Fool’s (which I reviewed earlier and has some of the best cappuccinos in town) is also there, but Escape Java Joint certainly takes the cake in the ‘strange’ department.  Trust me, just go there.

I wonder if someone tried to take these awesome chairs....
I wonder if someone tried to take these awesome chairs....

The place consists of several areas that are completely different (a couple separate buildings really).  When we went we sat in the huge outdoor area; they even have their names imprinted on the chairs.  There is no menu, but just have a chat with the guy behind the counter and he’ll try to figure out what you might like.  And he will check up on you several times to make sure your drink is good; it shows that they at least care!

Anyway, the cappuccino was decent.  Their smallest was a 12oz, so I ordered it dry.  It actually reminded me a lot of the cappuccino from Michelangelo’s on

There it is.
There it is.

State st.  Their scores turned out to be the same (in all regards).  I enjoyed the drink, and the strange environment added to the entire experience.  So I’m a happy camper.   Here are the numbers, all copied and pasted (out of 5):

Presentation: 3

Smoothness: 4

Strength: 3

Complexity: 3

Foam: 4

Correctness: 3

Mean: 3.33/5

SD: .52

So….go there.  It is cool and you will have fun.  Oh and they have music there a lot; one of their giant rooms has a stage.

Cappuccino Review # 13 – Froth House

Froth House

The front of Froth House; there is also a nice patio in the back
The front of Froth House; there is also a nice patio in the back.
11 N Allen St.
Madison

website

For an intro about how and why I am trying the cappuccinos of Madison, go here.

Some coffee shops I really want to be great; they have a certain feel that makes you really like them right when you walk in.  Froth House is just that sort of place.  It is the perfect neighborhood hangout where you expect to run into someone you know if you live in the area.  It also helps that it is my neighborhood coffee shop, located by the corner of Allen and Regent next to the Regent street coop, a wine and beer store, a book store, and a number of other small businesses.  Basically it is a little town center on Madison’s near west side, which is pretty cool.

The Froth House also has one of the better patio areas I have seen, and they serve food and drinks directly back there through a back window of the store.   Throw in the frequent musical acts and it makes their implementation of the patio one of the best in town.

But how is the cappuccino?  Sadly not so great.  Because the 12 oz is the

...but the table was cool....
...but the table was cool....

smallest size they serve, I ordered a dry cappuccino.   I got a drink that was filled to the brim of the cup, not a good sign.  The foam was of an ok quality, though there was way too much of it.  However, the drink itself was actually quite bad; on my first sip I tasted some coffee, but soon it degenerated into mostly milk (or rather, bitter milk).  It was essentially a latte, and a weak one at that.  Ok, the numbers: (all out of 5, as usual).

Presentation: 3

Smoothness: 3

Strength: 1

Complexity: 1

Foam: 3

Correctness: 1

Mean 2/5

SD: 1.1

On a more positive note, their Nutella latte is delicious, and their breakfasts are great too.  Just don’t get the cappuccino.

Cappuccino Review # 12 – Indie Coffee

Indie Coffee

Sort of easy to miss along Regent street
Sort of easy to miss along Regent street

1225 Regent St.
Madison

website

For an intro about how and why I am trying the cappuccinos of Madison, go here.

Indie Coffee is the only coffee shop near the middle of the University of Wisconsin campus.  So, during the time that I’ve worked in the psychology department at the UW (which is located in that part of campus) I’ve gotten several cappuccinos to go from there.  I remember them as being decent, but I never before tried the in house version of the drink; so, the shop was pretty new to me.  First of all, their food is excellent.  Taryn and I shared two wraps: a turkey walnut one and a vegi wrap with cheese and a whole host of great vegetables.  They were the among the best food I’ve ever had in a coffee shop.  They match up to the crepes at Bradbury’s; they were that good.  So, get some food if you go.

I ordered a dry small cappuccino because the smallest size was a 12oz.  The drink came in a coffee mug with the foam stacked to the top.  So, the drink had more foam than it should have.  There was a little design in the top of it (you can see this in the

The mark in the foam looks zen or something...
The mark in the foam looks zen or something...

picture), so it was a good looking stack of foam.  The drink itself was great.  The foam was pretty smooth and the strength was good, though perhaps a little too far on the wet side.  However, the coffee was quite complex with hints of meat coming through; I could tell that the underlying espresso was quite good.  So, overall, Indie Coffee makes a really good cappuccino.  I just wish that they had a 6oz option like some of the other top rate coffee shops.  Here are the numbers (all scores out of 5):

Presentation: 3

Smoothness: 5

Strength: 3

Complexity: 4

Foam: 4

Correctness: 3

Mean:  3.67 / 5

SD: .82

Taryn had a cup of the house blend coffee and said that it was decent; apparently it was a tad on the acidic side, so you might like it if that is your sort of thing.  So, the cappuccinos and coffee at Indie Coffee are pretty good; but the food is what you should come for!

Cappuccino Review #11 – Electric Earth Cafe

Electric Earth Cafe

Outside seating along W. Washington for Electric Earth Cafe.
Outside seating along W. Washington for Electric Earth Cafe.

546 W. Washington Ave.
Madison

For an intro about how and why I am trying the cappuccinos of Madison, go here.

Electric Earth is down West Washington ave. a ways from the capitol, across the street from the greyhound bus depot.  Taryn and I checked it out during a farmer’s market day, when pretty much all of the downtown and state street are overflowing.  It is far enough (away and on a road unfamiliar to tourists) so that it wasn’t busy at all.  There was a small sign saying that they are now under new management (so they don’t take old gift cards), so perhaps the place will be quite different now than a few months ago.  Neither of us had ever been here, so we have no means of comparison; but, keep that in change if you remember the old Electric Earth.

The shop itself is actually quite large.  There is a small amount of seating in the room by the counter area and then a huge separate room.  In the second room there was a small stage with a large window behind (a nice view of the street actually), so perhaps they have live music here at times (though I don’t know if this is true).  So, it seems that the building itself has potential.

I ordered a dry small cappuccino because their smallest size is 12oz.  It came in a coffee mug with a foam top of course bubbles.  Although the foam tasted fine (when

A cappuccino next to some mixed greens.
A cappuccino next to some mixed greens.

doesn’t it?), it wasn’t smooth at all and didn’t add anything.  The coffee itself was actually quite disappointing; it had very little in the way of nuance.  In fact, it had a slight burnt taste; this really started to bother me as I drank.  I didn’t really want to finish it; the cappuccino was honestly that bad…  Ok, I’ll just put up the numbers (all scores out of 5):

Presentation : 2

Smoothness: 2

Strength: 3

Complexity: 2

Foam: 2

Correctness: 3

Mean: 2.33 / 5

SD: .52

Taryn had a Chai latte and she said it was pretty much mostly milk and honey but very soothing; she liked it.  So, if you go to Electric Earth, maybe get the Chai but  don’t bother with the cappuccino.

A trip to Middleton Hills – An example of new urbanism

Last weekend, Taryn and I went on a little bike ride in the country; it was quite nice.  Rural Wisconsin is full of lovely….

Fields

countryroads2

Winding Roads

countryroads1

Cows

cowsand….Subdivisions!

outsideshot2

Ok, maybe that isn’t entirely fair; the cows really weren’t anywhere near the subdivision.  But, you should still get the point.  On the way back from our bike trip, we stopped by a subdivision in Middleton (a suburb of Madison) called Middleton Hills.  The neighborhood has been lauded as the first example of new urbanism in Wisconsin.  The concept of new urbanism isn’t exactly clear, but I take it to mean that it was constructed with a slightly higher density in order to facilitate a walking culture.  This is supposed to not only decrease traffic, but also facilitate community development by bringing people into common spaces.  I’m a fan of new urbanism, at least as it is theoretically laid out; however, I was curious whether that theory could be an effective guide to a real development in a very car oriented place like the Madison metro area.

Middleton Hills was designed by DPZ, headed by Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk in 1993 and has since then slowly developed.  There are two main aspects of the neighborhood to keep in mind.  First, the design of the neighborhood is in a new urbanist style; this means that houses have small yards, relatively high density (for the suburbs) and a distinct community center (with stores).  However, it is also a very regulated community; the dwellings are all designed in a certain style and every aspect of home and yard design is strictly regulated by a covenant (I recommend looking at the full covenant available at this site – its specificity is a bit startling).  For instance, every home design must be approved by a board to guarantee that it will fit cohesively within the community.  They prefer prairie style homes, so you will see an abundance of these in Middleton Hills.  If you don’t know anything about new urbanism, I recommend looking at the wikipedia article.  For now, I’m just going to start our journey through Middleton Hills…..

outsideshot1As one emerges from the nature preserve adjacent to Middlton Hills, you are treated to an interesting sight.  This part of the Middleton Hills (the north-east side) is full of new and large prairie homes.  That was what impressed me the most; these are very expensive homes, and that lends a certain air to the experience.  It is yuppie, ordered, and clean (to the point of almost being sterile); how you respond to those three adjectives will likely determine how you will feel about Middleton Hills.

low_density1All of the lawns are perfectly manicured (more so than I have every really seen) and every house looks to be in perfect condition.  The little trees and bushes seem to be carefully placed in a very deliberate way; and in fact, their placement is defined in the building plans.  All of this has been approved by the community design board; I didn’t like it; neighborhoods with a great deal of complexity and nature make me feel like there is something alive there.  Large, rich suburbs make me feel a bit uneasy;if I actually lived in such a place, I might start drinking a lot more.  However, we should remember that this is far newer than many of the neighborhoods that might seem more friendly or natural.  The complexity of old neighborhoods takes time, so perhaps Middleton Hills will become less sterile as it ages.  However, I wonder if the extensive controls of buildings and landscaping would allow for this development.  Only time will tell, I suppose.

boulevardAbove is the boulevard; perhaps when the trees grow up it will create a nice place to be but right now it just makes for a large expanse that is void of any life.  It does function as an indication of the main road; it made it easy for us to find the path to the community center but didn’t do much else.  One thing that started to bother me was the lack of people out and about; we had ridden through a good portion of the place without seeing a soul outside of their cars.  This entire construction (higher density, with front porches very close to the sidewalk) is supposed to make more people walk around the community but on such a beautiful Sunday afternoon, the streets were vacant.  That makes it seem like something is very wrong with the neighborhood.

mediumdensityThe closer one gets to the community center, the higher the density becomes.  Here you see duplexes (I think); I actually think these are pretty attractive and I like the idea of increasing density in this way.  However, these are extremely expensive.  I recently found an ad for one of these condos on the Middleton Hills neighborhood association web site and it was posted for $374k.  The problem is the type of condo this is; I’ll post the details below:

6874 Frank Lloyd Wright Ave
3 Bedrooms
2 Bath
2700 Sq.Ft.
$374,936.00

Impeccably maintained Middleton Hills condo overlooking pond. Beautiful sunsets right outside the front door! Built 7 years ago, it still looks brand new! Gourmet kitchen w/cherry cabinets, stainless appliances, solid surface counters. Open floor plan w/2 sided fireplace, maple floors, trim & doors, & attached screen porch. Spacious master w/whirlpool & ample closets throughout. Tons of additional storage. 3rd bedroom needs stairs for legal egress. Square footage taken from Middleton Assessor. Owner is licensed realtor. Open Sundays 1-3.

So, the homes and condos being sold in Middleton Hills are for the rich.  This is strange to me because this land should be cheap; one should be able to get a very affordable home all the way out in Middleton. However the prices for condos in this neighborhood rival those in downtown Madison, simply because they are constructed in a luxurious way.  One should remember that a central tenant of new urbanism is the need to build complete communities; you need to have places to live for both the person who owns the community store and the person who works behind the counter.

condos

This was the highest density area that I could find in the Middleton Hills development; they look to be more condos, and I am sure they are beautiful and expensive.  I think this absence of modest housing is a huge problem for the community; in a sense it means that this subdivision is not a community at all.  I will get to the “community center” in a moment, but I can preemt this by observing that most of those living here must drive to work every day.  The same goes for those working in the businesses nearby; the prices keep those who work at the nearby grocery store or coffee shop from actully living near their workplace.  The location is also poorly integrated with the mass transit system of the Madison metro area; this means that Middleton Hills is just as car centric as any other suburban area.  And this reliance on the car is one of the things new urbanism is meant to remedy.

starbucks1Here is the “community center”; the supermarket is off to the left (outside of the picture); it is a prairie style strip mall, I suppose.  The idea of having a shopping center close to ones home is that you might walk there.  I got the impression that most people took their car, even if they were just going to get a cup of coffee (and remember this was a near perfect day to be outside).

So, that is the end of the little tour.  I think Middlton Hills fails pretty miserably at being a good example of a well functioning community.  I suppose the architecture is more interesting than most subdivisions, but it lacks the same life that true urbanism provides.  I would be very intersted to see these principles developed in a part of town closer to where people work (and with better mass transit connections); but the current example, located so far from the necesities of life, is almost destined to fail.  In the end Middleton Hills felt almost like a caricature of new urbanism, rather than the real deal.  I’ll certainly return to this visit in some later posts; right now I have to go do something useful for a change.

Cappuccino Review #10 – Michelangelo’s Coffee House

Michelangelo’s Coffee House

114 State St.

This picture was taken from the outdoor seating.
This picture was taken from the outdoor seating.
Madison, WI 53703

website

For an intro about how and why I am trying the cappuccinos of Madison, go here.

Michelangelo’s is one of the nicer coffee shops on state; the interior is quite warm and friendly with normal tables along with some large recliner chairs if you feel a bit more leisurely. They also feature board games; a plus if you want to spend some time with coffee and scrabble.

I ordered a small dry cappuccino because their smallest size is 12oz. The drink I got

The cappuccino comes in a mug.
The cappuccino comes in a mug.

was filled with course bubbled foam all the way to the top. The cup was also quite a bit more narrow than it should have been, so at the end I experienced the all too common problem of having to lick the foam out of the bottom of the cup; I have no pride. Other than it not being the smoothest I’ve enjoyed, the foam was tasty and nice. The first few sips of the cappuccino were quite good. The coffee was not too complex but it was otherwise well balanced and tasted quite good. However, as the large amount of foam eventually mixed with the liquid of the cappuccino the drink became more milky; that is not what is supposed to happen.  So, here are the numbers (out of 5):

Presentation: 3

Smoothness: 4

Strength: 3

Complexity: 3

Foam: 4

Correctness: 3

Mean: 3.33/5

SD: .52

I would go back to Michelangelo’s because of it’s atmosphere and games but otherwise if I’m on state I’m still going to walk toward campus and get my cappuccino at Steep and Brew. So, this is it for my State St. reviews; they were generally pretty decent though they certainly don’t match up to the offerings of downtown or the near east side.

Cappuccino Review #9 – Steep and Brew

Steep & Brew

544 State Street

As with most coffee shops on State, Steep & Brew has outdoor seating
As with most coffee shops on State, Steep & Brew has outdoor seating.
Madison, WI 53703

website

For an intro about how and why I am trying the cappuccinos of Madison, go here

I am partial to certain coffee shops in Madison, sometimes without a whole lot of justification. Steep & Brew is one of those places; if I’m on State St. and want a cappuccino then I’ll be headed there. It might be because it was the first coffee shop I went to when I initially visited Madison. A friend who I was with ordered an espresso and didn’t quite know what this tiny cup he got was all about; I think he expected something like a latte. We were very young.

But actually since I’ve been here so much I know that Steep & Brew does serve a good cappuccino and has a great college town study atmosphere. It is the perfect place to go and get some work done, with plenty of tables so that there is almost always a place to sit. My best cappuccino experiences here have been during the weekday mornings but I went for this review on a weekday afternoon; so, keep that in mind.

I ordered a small cappuccino; their smalls are actual 6oz cappuccinos, so I didn’t have

The Steep and Brew cappuccino
The Steep and Brew cappuccino

to adjust my order. I got a nice looking drink in a proper cappuccino cup. The foam was smooth though there were some course bubbles. The first sip was of a classic cappuccino nature; the balance of the coffee to milk was almost perfect. The coffee was not as complex as some others, but otherwise a very pleasant espresso. It did however have a bit of a bitter bite that detracted slightly from the overall flavor; I notice that the cappuccinos in the morning don’t have this problem, so take that for what it’s worth. Overall the cappuccino was very good; the numbers are below(out of 5):

Presentation: 4

Smoothness: 4

Strength: 5

Complexity: 3

Foam: 4

Correctness: 5

Mean: 4.17/5

SD:  .75

Taryn had a Chai latte and noted that this was ok, though perhaps a little weak. So, to wrap it up, Steep and Brew has a very good cappuccino though it doesn’t match Mother Fool’s or Bradury’s.

Cappuccino Review #8 – Peet’s Coffee and Tea

Peet’s Coffee and Tea

800 Langdon St – Memorial Union
Peet's in Memorial Union on the UW campus
Peet's in Memorial Union on the UW campus.
Madison, WI 53706

website

For an intro about how and why I am trying the cappuccinos of Madison, go here.

This semester saw the opening of a coffee shop in Memorial Union (the UW main student union) called Peet’s. The shop is next to der Rathskeller (the performance area and bar) but the part right by Peet’s has been remodeled and now sports comfortable coffee shop style seating. Peet’s is a chain of coffee shops, and this is the exact feel you get upon walking into the Memorial Union location. Well, actually the climate was more akin to the part of a school cafeteria that they try to dress up as if it were an independent store; the workers looked just like union employees except with ‘Peet’s’ on their aprons. I’m not saying this is a bad thing, but just be prepared for it if you go.

Before I ordered I inquired about the size of the small cappuccino. It is 12oz. Ok, this is pretty normal, so I asked for a small dry cappuccino. What happened next actually impressed me quite a bit. The barista (she seemed new) made the cappuccino in the 12oz cup and, as it should have been, the drink didn’t come even close to the top. I get the impression that most baristas are told to fill the cup to the top (why would anyone want a half full drink?!), and she was no different.  So, the puzzled barista asked the other barista there what she should do about this half-full cappuccino. The other barista told her to ask me. This may seem incredibly simple but I sure appreciated it. I told her that the drink looked good and I actually got a well proportioned cappuccino. It is probably worth noting that they only have paper cups regardless of whether you are taking your drink to go or not. I assume this is because almost all of their customers are taking their drinks to go and dishes add another unwanted dimension to their business (the seating area is also out of sight of the store front, so they are also probably worried about theft). So, I sort of understand the lack of real cups.

The foam was just ok; it was mostly course and not very smooth. The coffee itself was

I hope you like paper.
I hope you like paper.

uninteresting, though not bad. One redeeming factor is that the cappuccino was certainly strong enough; it was not a glorified latte that is so common in chain coffee shops. In fact the drink bordered on being a bit too strong and overly bitter, though I’m not usually one to complain about that. It is perhaps fitting that I was actually reminded of Starbucks; I suppose most large chains are similar in this way. Taryn just had their drip coffee and said it was quite good; when she ordered it they had to prepare a new batch, so that probably contributed to its deliciousness. Taryn’s friend Rachael had the chai latte and said it was a little weak and that the foam had the consistency of “dish soap”….so there you have it. The numbers for the cappuccino are below:

Presentation: 2

Smoothness: 2

Strength: 3

Complexity: 2

Foam: 3

Correctness: 4

Mean: 2.67/5

SD: .82

So, if you are on the east end of the UW campus and want a cappuccino what should you do?  I would say walk a few more blocks to state street…..though I guess it all depends on how lazy you are.  But, if you just want some drip coffee then maybe Peet’s is a good bet.